CHAPTER XXIII to XXIV

 (15 June 1970 to 11 June 1971)

USS Midway (CVA-41) underway on 20 June 1963, with F-3 Demon, F-4B Phantom II and F-8 Crusader jet fighters on her flight deck. The two Crusaders parked furthest forward are from Fighter Squadron 24 (VF-24). Photographed by PH1 J.D. Osborne. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97632). NS024123. NHC.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024123.jpg

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

-Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Underway Training off the coast of northern California in OP-AREA-260 (6 to 19 June 1970); Pre-Shakedown Training off the coast of southern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREAS-290 and W-291 (29 June to 2 July 1970); Shakedown Training off the coast of southern California under the operational control of Commander Fleet Training Group, San Diego (20 July to 4 September 1970) out of home port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California; Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay for Dr-dock (late September or 1 November 1970 to 3 January 1971); Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials off the coast of northern California in OP- AREA -260 from 8 to 10 December 19700), at the shipyard from arrival from her home port (late September or 1 November 1970 to 8 December 1970 to 10 December 1970 to 3 January 1971), followed by Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the Fleet Training Group in Southern California operating areas (4 to 28 January 1971); Refresher Training at NAS North Island and local operating areas (1 to 8 February 1971); Underway Training and Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Northern California in OP-Area SIERRA (16 to 19 February 1971); Exercise Admixture with Carrier Air Wing FIVE in Southern California OP-Areas from 23 February to 4 March 1971); Family Day Cruise on 20 March 1971, ending the same day; embarking 200 distinguished civilian guests aboard for an orientation cruise to observe Carrier Qualifications in Northern California OP-Area W-283 (22 to 23 March 1971) and remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California (24 March to 15 April 1971), preparing for Overseas Movement Period (POM) from 26 March to 15 April 1971. (15 June 1970 to 15 April 1971)

CHAPTER XXIII

 

 

      “USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay for homeport, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 June 1970 and the same day, Commandant of the Twelfth Naval District accepts delivery of Midway from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, reporting to Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet for duty in-the Naval Air Force, Pacific Fleet with the completion of the Fitting Out Period and prepared for a summer of training. Since Midway’s departure from NAS Alameda, California on 11 February 1966, SCB-101 at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay was conducted from 11 February 1966 to 31 January 1970 and Midway was recommissioned a second time on 31 January 1970, with Captain Eugene J. Carroll Jr. assuming command at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. Midway departed for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California and entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard on 11 February 1966 for extensive modernization where she was decommisioned on 15 October 1966. Midway underwent her final renovation before going to her new forward deployed home, conducting Dock Trials at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 14 to 15 February 1970; Fast Cruise conducted at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 27 February to 1 March 1970 and Second Fast Cruise Conducted at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard on 14 March 1970. Midway underway for the first time in more than four (4) years, Builders Trials conducted off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 17 to 20 March 1970; conducted Preliminary acceptance trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 23 to 24 April 1970. Midway conducted Underway Trials. Midway is presented to the President of the Board of Inspection and Survey, RADM Bulkkeley from 27 to 30 April 1970, returning to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard where she remained until departure” (Ref. 1178-G, 1180A, 1180B, 1181N, 1183 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

      “USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 16 June 1970, conducting Underway Training off the coast of northern California in OP-AREA-260 from 6 to 19 June 1970, returning on 19 June 1970,

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 29 June 1970, conducting Pre-Shakedown Training off the coast of southern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREAS-290 and W-291 from 29 June to 2 July 1970, returning on 2 July 1970,

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 20 July 1970, for Shakedown Training off the coast of southern California under the operational control of Commander Fleet Training Group, San Diego. Additionally, Midway faced the return of the INSURV Board for Final Acceptance Trials.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) first UNREP since recommissioning occurred on 29 July 1970 when she received fuel from USS Chemung (AO-30), Aircraft from the Naval Air Test Center Pautuxent River, Maryland, arrived for Aircraft Compatibility Trials (ACT), testing Midway’s catapults, arresting gear and aircraft handling crews.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) first arrested landing of a fixed wing aircraft occurred on 8 August 1970 when LCDR D. A. Gerrish trapped in a C-1A aircraft. The first catapult launch was recorded the following day when CDR J. B. Wildman was shot off the port catapult in an A-7E. The ACT was successful and Midway’s flight deck was certified for unrestricted flight operations shortly thereafter.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Final Acceptance Trials off the coast of southern California from 17 to 21 August 1970. The INSURV Board returned to Midway for Final Acceptance Trials. The results of this second INSURV showed that while Midway still had a number of material deficiencies which could degrade her performance in primary mission areas she was reliable and acceptable, and should be ready to join the fleet following Post Shakedown Availability.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 4 September 1970, conducting Shakedown Training off the coast of southern California under the operational control of Commander Fleet Training Group, San Diego from 20 July to 4 September 1970. Two underway/pre-shakedown training periods in June and July preceded Midway’s reporting to Commander Fleet Training Group, San Diego for Shakedown Training. During these periods the JP-5 fuel system pumped fuel to an aircraft for the first time and the first rounds were fired from the 5 inch batteries during structural test firings. Midway’s first UNREP since recommissioning occurred on 29 July 1970 when she received fuel from USS Chemung (AO-30), Aircraft from the Naval Air Test Center Pautuxent River, Maryland, arrived for Aircraft Compatibility Trials (ACT), testing Midway’s catapults, arresting gear and aircraft handling crews. Midway’s first arrested landing of a fixed wing aircraft occurred on 8 August 1970 when LCDR D. A. Gerrish trapped in a C-1A aircraft. The first catapult launch was recorded the following day when CDR J. B. Wildman was shot off the port catapult in an A-7E. The ACT was successful and Midway’s flight deck was certified for unrestricted flight operations shortly thereafter. Midway conducted Final Acceptance Trials off the coast of southern California from 17 to 21 August 1970. The INSURV Board returned to Midway for Final Acceptance Trials. The results of this second INSURV showed that while Midway still had a number of material deficiencies which could degrade her performance in primary mission areas she was reliable and acceptable, and should be ready to join the fleet following Post Shakedown Availability. Shakedown Training was a thing of beauty. General Quarters, battle messing, man overboard drills, setting closure conditions and battle problems, over and over. The weeks of hard work in preparation for the Final Battle Problem under the critical eyes of the Fleet Training Group paid off. A feeling of pride and accomplishment filled the hearts of the men of Midway as Captain Carroll announced the results: four grades of Outstanding, four Excellents and two grades of 84 or above. Midway had turned in the best performance of any ship in the past year and completed Shakedown Training one week ahead of schedule. With a successful summer behind her Midway returned to homeport, NAS Alameda (20 July to 4 September 1970).

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California in September 1970, for dry-dock at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) was Dry-docked at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 1 to 24 November 1970.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 5 to 6 December 1970.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 8 December 1970, conducting Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials off the coast of northern California in OP-AREA -260 from 8 to 10 December 1970, in port at the shipyard from late September or 1 November 1970 to 8 December 1970, returning on December 1970.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 3 January 1971, for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, conducting Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials off the coast of northern California in OP-AREA-260 from 8 to 10 December 1970, returning to the shipyard upon conclusión, in port at shipyard from arrival from her home port in late September or 1 November 1970 to 8 December 1970 and 10 December to 3 January 1971, Dry-docked at from 1 to 24 November 1970, conducting Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 5 to 6 December 1970. The shipyard's work package had already been planned as had the Ship's Force Overhaul and Management System (SFOMS) which programmed the Ship's Force share of the work to be accomplished while in the shipyard. Through close coordination between the shipyard and the ship a tremendous amount of work was accomplished by the end of the year. Midway now looked forward to 1971, the arrival of her Air Wing (CVW-5) and Seventh Fleet Operations. The Midway was recommissioned on 31 January 1970. The most comprehensive ship modernization ever undertaken by the United States Navy was initiated for the purpose of providing an attack carrier with similar capabilities to CVA’s of the Forrestal class and above. Midway flight deck area was nearly doubled from 2.82 to 4.02 acres; two high performance catapults were installed and numerous other projects were completed and tested prior to the end of 1970. Nineteen Seventy-One, however, was the year that would test this new capability and the crew that sailed her. Initially the Fleet Training Group at San Diego observed the ship with only ship’s company aboard. Carrier Air Wing FIVE then joined Midway and air operations commenced in Earnest.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 4 January 1971, conducting Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the Fleet Training Group in Southern California operating areas from 4 to 28 January 1971. Of particular note is that on 22 January, Lieutenant (junior grade) R. Etchevery of VA-125 landed his A7A aboard Midway to mark the 1000th arrested landing since recomissioning. Additionally, 1,161 carrier qualification landings were completed without mishap. Midway returned on 28 January 1971,

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 1 February 1971, conducting Refresher Training at NAS North Island and local operating areas from 1 to 8 February 1971, returning on 8 February 1971.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 16 February 1971, conducting Underway Training and Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Northern California in OP-Area SIERRA from 16 to 19 February 1971, returning on 19 February 1971.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 23 February 1971, conducting Exercise Admixture with Carrier Air Wing FIVE in Southern California OP-Areas from 23 February to 4 March 1971, returning on 4 March 1971,

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 8 March 1971, conducting Operational Readiness Inspection with Carrier Air Wing FIVE in Southern California Op-Areas from 8 to 19 March 1971. When the results were tabulated it became clear that the previous months of modernization and extensive training of the crew had resulted in a high level of operational readiness. Midway returned on 19 March 1971.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California at 0700 on 20 March 1971, for a Family Day Cruise ending the same day. The crew of Midway received the chance to show off their ship and the skills of ship's company and air wing.  This was the first dependents cruise since Midway’s extensive four year modernization. A large crowd of guests were treated to a series of air shows, involving both launch end recovery cycles and a firepower demonstration.  Static aircraft displays, tours of the ship and a demonstration by the Marine Detachment drill team were also on the agenda. A cookout on the hangar deck and film entertainment rounded out the day. Dependents and guests were unanimous in their appreciation of an informative and enjoyable day, while ship's company and air wing personnel could look back on the day with pride.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 22 March 1971, embarking and disembarking 200 distinguished civilian guests aboard for an orientation cruise to observe Carrier Qualifications in Northern California OP-Area W-283 from 22 to 23 March 1971. During February and March Midway continued its underway training that was to sharpen our skills and expose us to inspection. In addition to night operations, special weapons exercises and ammunition UNREPS occupied our time. Operation NUMERO UNO, as the cruise was designated, was an unqualified success as influential representatives of the Bay Area observed carrier operations at sea. In addition to a firepower demonstration, each guest was escorted throughout the ship and received extensive briefings on the operations and functions of a modern attack carrier. Numerous letters were later received that praised the high caliber and efficiency of the crew and thanked the Command for its hospitality. Midway returned on 24 March 1971.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 24 March to 15 April 1971, preparing for Overseas Movement Period (POM) from 26 March to 15 April 1971. In the last 25 days prior to deployment our work program was intense. Food requirements for 4,500 men, ordnance for South East Asia operations and fuel for the 6,000 mile trip were just a few of the mirage of pre-deployment requirements” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

CNO COMMISSIONING ORDER (31 January 1970)

CHAPTER XXIII

Appendix I

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS

WASHINGTON, D. C. 20350

 

In reply refer to

OP-431K/jj

Ser 1589P43

17 Jan 1970

 

From:    Chief of Naval Operations

 

To:        Commandant, TWELTH Naval District

 

Subj      Commissioning Order for MIDWAY (CVA-41)

 

1.  When MIDWAY is in all respects ready, place the ship “In Commission, Special” on or about 31 January 1970 and direct the Commanding Officer, USS MIDWAY to:

 

             a.  Report upon commissioning to the Commander Naval Air Force, U. S. Pacific Fleet for completion of fitting out at San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California.

             b.  Report a change of status to “In Commission”, in accordance with movement report instructions, when fitting out is completed and prior to reporting to Fleet Commander in Chief.

             c.  Report by message to the Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet for duty in the Naval Air Force, U. S. Pacific Fleet, upon completion of fitting out.

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) MUSTER ROLL AND ROSTER OF OFFICERS ON COMMISSIONING (31 January 1970)

CHAPTER XXIII

Appendix II

 

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41), FLEET POST OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 96601

 

In reply Refer to

CVA41:32:clc

5750

Ser: 375

From:  Commanding Officer, USS MIDWAY (CVA 41)

To:        Chief of Naval Operations (OP-05D2)

 

Subj      Command History; submission of

Ref:      (a) OPNAVINST 5750.12 series

Encl      (1)  Muster Roll and Roster of Officers on Commissioning

             (2)  Biography and Photograph of Commanding Officer

 

1.  Reference (a) requires that each commissioned ship and shore station submit a Command History for the previous year by 1 March.

 

2.  USS MIDWAY (CVA 41) was decommissioned 15 February 1966 and was recommissioned 31 January 1970.  During this period MIDWAY underwent conversion and modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California, and items of interest pertaining to MIDWAY are included in the Shipyard’s historical reports.

 

3.  Command of the new MIDWAY was assumed by Captain Eugene J. CARROLL, Jr., U. S. Navy on 31 January 1970.  MIDWAY is under operational control of Commander, Carrier Division SEVEN and has reported to Commander Naval Air Force, U. S. Pacific Fleet, for fitting out availability at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard.

 

4.  Enclosures (1) and (2) are forwarded as required by reference (a).

 

E. J. CARROLL

 

Copy to:

Director of Naval History (OP-09B9)

CINCPACFLT

COMNAVAIRPAC

COMCARDIV SEVEN

COM HUNTERS POINT NAVSHIPYD

 

MUSTER ROLL AND ROSTER OF OFFICERS ON COMMISSIONING

 

1.          W01 George C. ADAIR, USN, 737765/7432

2.          LTJG John S. BAKER, SC, USNR, 741602/3105

3.          LCDR Ervin R. SLUM, USN, 640369/6352

4.          LTJG Bruce BOVENIZER, USNR, 729214/1105

5.          LCDR Joseph A. BRANTUAS, USN, 630376/1310

6.          ENS Edwin E. BROADHURST, USNR, 754283/1105

7.          LCDR Kenneth H. BROOMHEAD, USN, 247549/6150

8.          CDR Jim F. CAMERON, USN, 526244/1310

9.          CAPT Eugene J. CARROLL, Jr., USN, 453300/1310

10.        W01 Frank J. CHESLA, USN, 753651/7662

11.        LCDR Bruce A. CLARK, USN, 603899/1100

12.        CDR John A. DECHANT, USN, 602470/1310

13.        LCDR William F. DELANEY, USN, 634388/1310

14.        LT Marvin M. DODGE, USN, 701516/1100

15.        W01 Bobby L. DOWTY, USN, 753404/7232

16.        LT Alfred M. DURAZO, USN, 685434/6572

17.        LTJG Robert F. ECROYD, MSC, USNR, 740407/2305

18.        W01 Arland C. EDWARDS, USN, 753365/7212

19.        CW02 Robert B. EMSWILER, USN, 711479/7602

20.        LTJG John E. FITZHUGH II, USN, 734940/1520

21.        CW02 Virgil E. FREDERICK, USN, 707556/7822

22.        LCDR Jeryl D. FUNDERBURK, USN, 618178/1310

23.        CDR Raymond G. FOX, Jr., USN, 553104/1310

24.        LT Dale F. FURMAN, Jr., USN, 647551/1310

25.        LTJG Wallace R. GARRISON, USN, 717583/1100

26.        ENS James J. GEAGAN, USN, 747307/1100

27.        LCDR Peter A. GENTLING, MC, USNR, 692644/2105

28.        ENS Gary W. GRAF, USNR, 750908/1105

29.        W01 Jerry L. GILLUM, USN, 737607/7232

30.        LT Ralph G. GRANNEMAN, USN, 661244/6802

31.        ENS James M. GREEN, USNR, 749415/1105

32.        LCDR Robert G. GROSSE, SC, USN, 580401/3100

33.        LCDR John H. GROTENHUIS, USN, 655596/1310

34.        LT Hal R. HALENZA, USN, 650348/6702

35.        LTJG John H. HANAN, USNR, 726188/1105

36.        W01 Louis F. HAYWOOD, USN, 753370/7212

37.        ENS Michael L. HELMS, USNR, 755681/1105

38.        CDR Leonard H. HIGGINBOTHAM, USN, 541873/1310

39.        ENS Robert M. HOOD, USN, 735092/1100

40.        LTJG Richard P. HOWE, USN, 717693/1100

41.        LCDR Terry L. HOWELL, USN, 635742/1310

42.        LT Francis L. HUDNOR III, USN, 674430/1310

43.        CDR Thomas L. JACKSON, USN, 553744/1310

44.        CAPT George E. JACOBSSEN, Jr., USN, 505054/1310

45.        ENS Steven W. JOHNSON, USNR, 750941/1105

46.        LT Thomas J. KELLEY, USN, 678282/1100

47.        ENS Reginald R. KENNEDY, USNR, 756794/1105

48.        LCDR Bernard J. KENNELLY, USN, 615456/1630

49.        LCDR John D. KING, USN, 614413/1350

50.        CW02 Gerald L. KJELLBERG, USN, 737343/7132

51.        CDR Alfred KURZENHAUSER, USN, 569138/1400

52.        LT Doyle R. LEMONS, USN, 661376/1100

53.        LT Ralph N. LIES, USN, 686068/6402

54.        LT Gerald T. LOMBARDI, SC, USNR, 691883/3105

55.        LCDR Wilfred B. MACK, CHC, USNR, 573138/4105

56.        W01 Dero M. MAPLES, Jr., USN, 753713/7742

57.        LCDR Frank J. MARSH, Jr., USN, 633854/6602

58.        CDR George R. MATAIS, USN, 570127/1310

59.        LTJG David S. MATHER, SC, USNR, 741830/3105

60.        LCDR William P. MCNEER, Jr., USN, 661760/1310

61.        LCDR George W. MILLER, Jr., USN, 618612/1520

62.        ENS Robert M. MILLER, USNR, 754987/1355

63.        LT William C. MINGS, USN, 651697/6202

64.        ENS Charles J. MIZEJEWSKI, Jr., USN, 570164/3100

65.        LTJG Charles M. MOOS, USNR, 733472/1105

66.        CDR Joseph A. MUKA, Jr., USN, 570164/1310

67.        ENS Gordon L. NELSON, Jr., USNR, 755732/1105

68.        LTJG Arthur D. NOEY, Jr., SC, USNR, 735416/3105

69.        LTJG Peter L. PANSING, USNR, 729941/1355

70.        ENS Marvin PROSONO, USNR, 750991/1105

71.        LT Donald B. REESE, CHC, USNR, 713278/4105

72.        LCDR Thomas D. ROBINS, USN, 633873/6702

73.        ENS Timothy J. ROETHELE, USNR, 747327/1105

74.        W01 William H. ROWELL, Jr., USN, 753512/7542

75.        LT Norman E. RUSS, USN, 685843/6602

76.        ENS Michael R. RUTLEDGE, USNR, 749534/1105

77.        LCDR Allan D. SCHAUER, USN, 631375/1310

78.        ENS Edward G. SCHILLING, USNR, 756012/1105

79.        LTJG Charles S. SCHRODER, USNR, 728466/1105

80.        LCDR William M. SCOTT, USN, 580719/1310

81.        CDR Gail J. SHARP, USN, 583720/1310

82.        W01 John E. SIDES, USN, 753482/7432

83.        CW02 Lester C. SMITH, USN, 722204/7822

84.        LTJG Charles H. SPEACE, USN, 705893/1100

85.        LTJG William C. STANTON, USNR, 732488/1105

86.        ENS Stanley J. STEPHENS, USNR, 755558/1105

87.        ENS William R. STEVENSON, USNR, 744954/1105

88.        W01 Howard L. TAYLOR, USN, 738520/7982

89.        CDR Louis H. C. THIEL, Jr., USN, 513929/1310

90.        W01 Arthur L. TIMMERMANN, USN, 753332/7142

91.        ENS Robert S. TREMLETT, SC, USNR, 744969/3105

92.        CDR Richard D. ULREY, DC, USN, 589265/2200

93.        LCDR John USTICK, HSN, 614938/1310

94.        LCDR Walter W. VISNISKI, Jr., SC, USNR, 550115/3107

95.        LT Ralph W. WATERS, USN, 661061/6372

96.        LTJG John M. WEIGLE, SC, USN, 733303/3100

97.        ENS Paul S. WEITZEL, USNR, 755805/1405

98.        LCDR Thomas A. WHALEN, USN, 148028/6302

99.        CDR Jack A. WHITE, SC, USN, 584815/3100

100.      LT Jeffrey P. WHITE, JAGC, USNR, 743299/2505

101.      LCDR Richard P. WHITLOCK, DC, USN, 754960/2200

102.      LT Thomas A. WIGHT, DC, USNR, 663034/2205

103.      LT Bernard W. WITZKE, USN, 646725/6302

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

CAPTAIN EUGENE J. CARROLL, JR., U. S. NAVY

COMMANDING OFFICER

 

Captain Eugene J. CARROLL, Jr. brings to the USS MIDWAY (CVA 41) a Navy career spanning nearly 27 years, including service during World War II, the Korean Conflict and Vietnam.

 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. CARROLL who now live in Bell, California, Captain CARROLL was born on December 2, 1923, in Miami, Arizona.  He attended the California Institute of Technology prior to entering the Navy Flight Training Program in July 1943.  he received his commission as an Ensign in April 1945 and upon completion of flight training, he was ordered to the Naval Air Station, Atlanta, Georgia, for flight instructor training.

 

Following a series of assignments as an instrument flight instructor and 17 months at the Naval Air Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, he graduated from General Line School, Monterey, California, in 1949.  he was ordered to Attack Squadron 65 as Flight Officer in 1950.  the squadron was embarked in USS BOXER, USS VALLEY FORGE and USS PHILIPPINE SEA during operations in the Korean action.  After his tour with the squadron, he reported to Naval Air Station, Los Alamitos, California, as Attack Training Officer and served as Training Officer for VA-771, VA-772 and VA-773.

 

In early 1954 he was ordered to the USS GREENWICH BAY as Navigator.  At that time the GREENWICH BAY (AVP-41), a seaplane tender, was flagship of the Commander, Middle East Force. After that assignment, he assumed duties as the Maintenance Officer of Attack Squadron 176 for two years.

 

Graduating from the Naval War College in 1957-58, he served on the Lieutenant Commander assignment desk at the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington until 1960. Leaving that position, he was assigned as Executive Officer of Attack Squadron 36, flying the A-4 Skyhawk. He assumed command of that squadron in May, 1962, and served there until he was assigned to the Army War College. Subsequently he assume command of Attack Squadron 43 in July 1964 at NAS Oceana, Virginia.

 

Following that tour he served as Operations Officer and then Executive Officer of the attack carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CVA-63) during 8 months of operations in Vietnam. He later was Operations Officer for the Commander of Carrier Division One, including another 6 months in Vietnam. In January, 1968, he assumed command of the USS OGDEN (LPD 5), an amphibious assault ship which conducted a series of combat landings of both marines and army units in Vietnam in 1968 and 1969.

 

In April 1969, he reported to the Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific for temporary duty in preparation for command of USS MIDWAY. On 28 July, 1969, he arrived at Hunters Point and assumed duties as Prospective Commanding Officer of MIDWAY.

Captain CARROLL holds the Legion of Merit and two awards of the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V for service in Vietnam, 4 Air Medals, 3 Navy Unit Commendations, the American Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Medal (Asia), China Service Medal (Extended), National Defense Service Medal with Bronze Star, Korean Service Medal, United National Service Medal (Korea) and the Vietnam Service Medal. He has also been awarded decorations by the Governments of South Korea and South

 

Vietnam.

 

Captain CARROLL is married to the former Margaret STEFFEN of Northumberland, Pennsylvania. They have a son, Dennis who is a sophomore at Dartmouth College.

 

The Captain holds A.B. and M.A. degrees in International Affairs from George Washington University in Washington.

 

 

Eighth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her eighth South China Sea, on her second Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East (16 April to 6 November 1971).

CHAPTER XXIV

 

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Rear Admiral J. L. Butts, Jr., Commander Carrier Division ONE, arriving aboard to assume duties of Carrier Division Commander on 15 April 1971 and at 0001 16 April activated CTG 17.3, with Captain F. T. Hemer as Chief of Staff Carrier Division One, and Commander  Captain R. B. Rutherford, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 16 April 1971, with Captain E. J. Carroll, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Captain G. E. Jacobssen Jr., as Executive Officer, on her eighth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her eighth South China Sea, on her second Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her first deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her seventh deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington. In April 1971, Midway made her seventeenth deployment, not sixteenth (second Caribbean Sea Cruise in areas off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Culebra Island, Puerto Rico. While en route on 22 April 1946, Midway rendered a 21-gun salute to President Harry S, Truman who joined the task group in USS Frankland D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), flagship of the EIGHTH Fleet (and after visiting Port of Spain, Trinidad, the President left the task Group (1st FWFD) (19 April to 10 June 1946 (53-days)) or 3rd North Atlantic Cruise (Ports of calls included: Firth of Clyde, Greenock, Scotland Cherbourg, France) (26 August to 8 October 1952 (37-days)), as reported in Midway’s 1971 Command History Report 13,000 tons heavier than her original full pay load figure; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 17th deployment since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (16 April to 6 November 1971)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1180, 1180AA, 1180A, 1180B, 1180C, 1180D, 1180D1, 1180D2, 1180E, 1180F, 1180G, 1180H, 1180I, 1180J, 1180J2, 1180J3, 1080K, 1180L, 1180M, 1180N, 1180O, 1180P, 1180Q, 1180R, 1180S, 1180T, 1180U, 1180V, 1180W, 1180X, 1180Y, 10181N, USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1972).  

 

USS Midway (CVA 41) WestPac Cruise Book 19711180

Chain of Command – Ref. 1180D2

COMCARDIV 1 Staff – Ref. 1180K

The Cruise and Ports of Call – Ref. 1180L

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(16 April to 6 November 1971)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) – 3rd & 7th

8th WestPac

8th SCS

CVW-5

NF

16 Apr 1971

6 Nov 1971

Vietnam War

17th FWFD

205-days

2nd Vietnam Combat Cruise

Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE); Yankee Station” responsibility again on 30 June 1971, on “Yankee Station,” conducting Combat Missions, Special Operations, Single Carrier Operations and Air Operatins on four line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin on “Yankee Station,” conducting Exercise “Autumn Flower;” with the Japanese Defense Force and with Okinawa, Exercise “Commando Mirage” en route Yankee Station” in the Far East.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                   Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4B

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7B

VA-56

Champions -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7B

VA-115

Arabs -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

NF500

A-6A / KA-6D Tanker

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet -      Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VAW-115

 

Liberty Bells -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

VAQ-130 Det. 2

Zappers -                 Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

610

EKA-3B

HC-1 Det. 8

Fleet Angels -        Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

003-006

SH-3G

*HC-7 Det. 110

Pacific Fleet Angels -        Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Search and Rescue

 

HH-3A

**C1A Det.

 

 

 

 

*These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment.

**During Midway’s conversion, all aviation fuel tanks were converted for jet fuel only and it was planned that only the turbojet powered C2A COD aircraft would be utilized. While en route to the Western Pacific word was received that all CVA’s would be required to carry one C1A aircraft for logistics, mail and cargo flights. Midway accepted her own C1A on 12 May 1971. The original “Cod Squad” crews conducted field quals at NAS Cubi Point on 14 to 15 May 1970. Initial carrier quals on 16 to 17 May 1970. Midway flew the first scheduled logistics flight on 18 May 1970. Midway’s first day on the line, Triple zero (000) met every scheduled commitment throughout the deployment.

 

      “Until 1964 command of Task Force 77 rotated between the deployed carrier division commanders; from 1964 Carrier Group Five was permanent deployed to the Western Pacific as CTF 77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines ([4]). In December 1971, Commander Carrier Division 5, Rear Admiral Damon W. Cooper, led Task Force 74 aboard USS Enterprise (CVN(A)-65) to the Indian Ocean following the outbreak of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 ([5])” (Ref. [4] & [5] of 1193).

 

 

      “Almost immediately, upon reaching open sea, USS Midway (CVA-41) encountered rough seas, durinng which time the forward starboard sponsor suffered extensive damage and it was decided to put into Pearl Harbor to effect repairs. The five days required to repair Midway’s sponson precluded participation in the scheduled Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE)” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) underway in the Pacific Ocean, 19 April 1971. Official U.S. Navy Photograph (photo # KN-19524). NS024108a. Submitted by: Scott Dyben. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024108a.jpg

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) pullied in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 26 April 1971. During 16 and 17 April the forward starboard sponsor suffered extensive damage do to rough seas upon reaching open sea and it was decided to put into Pearl Harbor to effect repairs. The five days required to repair Midway’s sponson precluded participation in the scheduled Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE).

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 26 to 30 April 1971. Rear Admiral Butts was honored by the visit of CINCPACFLT, Admiral and Mrs. Bernard A. Clarey, Vice Admiral and Mrs. D. C. Richardson and Lieutenant General and Mrs. G. A. Corcoran on 29 April 1971. Midway departed Pearl Harbor on 1 May. During 16 and 17 April the forward starboard sponsor suffered extensive damage do to rough seas upon reaching open sea and it was decided to put into Pearl Harbor to effect repairs. The five days required to repair Midway’s sponson precluded participation in the scheduled Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE). During the period 26 April to 1 May the sponson damage was corrected and Midway was ready to put to sea.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) chopped to operational control of Commander Seventh Fleet on 7 May 1971.

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) C1A Detachment, known as “Easy Way Airlines” was conceived, born and in full carrier operation in less than two weeks. During Midway’s conversion, all aviation fuel tanks were converted for jet fuel only and it was planned that only the turbojet powered C2A COD aircraft would be utilized. While en route to the Western Pacific word was received that all CVA’s would be required to carry one C1A aircraft for logistics, mail and cargo flights. Midway accepted her own C1A on 12 May 1971. The original “Cod Squad” crews conducted field quals at NAS Cubi Point on 14 to 15 May 1970” (Ref. 1180M).

 

The original “Cod Squad” crews – Ref. 1180N

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 13 May 1971.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 13 to 15 May 1971, departing for “Yankee Station,” to conduct Combat Missions, Special Operations and Single Carrier Operations, on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) C1A Detachment, known as “Easy Way Airlines” flew the first scheduled logistics flight on 18 May 1970. Midway’s first day on the line, Triple zero (000) met every scheduled commitment throughout the deployment. Being based at Da Nang Air Base, RVN, careful, thorough fuel planning and management by flight crews was mandatory in conducting operations aboard ship without a fueling capability. This professional approach to airmanship was evident during every line period. Easy Way Airlines would begin displaying Midway’s flag throughout many foreign airports including Japan. Philippines, Okinawa, Taiwan, South Viet Nam, and Thailand, before C1A Triple Zero would return to San Francisco, California with Midway and will continue its operations out of NAS Alameda, California.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) C1A Detachment, known as “Easy Way Airlines” initial carrier quals were conducted on 16 to 17 May 1971” (Ref. 1181P).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Vietnam and on 18 May 1971, after relieving USS Hancock (CV-19) on “Yankee Station,” to conduct combat missions, Special Operations, single carrier operations, on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin.

 

       Vice Admiral Maurice F, Weisner, Commander Seventh Fleet visited USS Midway (CVA-41) on 22 May 1971” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “After an eight day line period on “Yankee Station”, conducting Combat Missions, Special Operations and Single Carrier Operations, USS Midway (CVA-41) first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin Midway stood down on 26 May 1971 for a one day rest” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) heralded the first of numerous typhoons that required the ship to divert from “Yankee Station” from 28 to 30 May 1971. Typhoon Dinah forced the ship to head south for the safety of calmer waters” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

       On 30 May 1971 the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral E. R. Zumwalt, Jr. arrived for a short visit aboard USS Midway (CVA-41). After conferring with Rear Admiral Butts and Captain Carroll, he reenlisted 25 men into the Navy, met with the junior officers in the wardroom and held a forum over Midway’ s TV station, KMID

 

       General Creighton Abrams, Commander Military Assistance Command Vietnam, and Vice Admiral Weisner arrived aboard toured the ship USS Midway (CVA-41) for a four hour period on 2 June 1971. General Abrams and was briefed on operations. Before leaving he gave a short overview of S. E. Asia operations over KMID.

 

      “On 4 June 1971, Prince Manghra Souvanna Phouma, Prince of Laos to South Vietnam arrived aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) for a short visit” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) underway in the Gulf of Tonkin during operations off North Vietnam, June 1971 NS0241af. Submitted by: Robert Hurst.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241af.jpg

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) departed “Yankee Station” on 10 June 1971, returning to Vietnam on 18 May 1971, she relieved USS Hancock (CV-19) on “Yankee Station” the same day, conducting Combat Missions, Special Operations and Single Carrier Operations, on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin from 18 May to 9 June 1971 (23-days). After an eight day line period on “Yankee Station,Midway stood down on 26 May 1971 for a one day rest, contiunig operational stand down until the 27th. With the exception of the stand-down period of 26 to 27 May and evasion of typhoon Dinah from 28 to 30 May 1971, the first line period was completed as scheduled and without mishap” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “While en route Yokosuka, Japan, USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Exercise “Blue Sky" with the Taiwan Defense Force while passing the Island on 11 June 1971” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Yokosuka, Japan on 14 June 1971, ending her first line periodYankee Station”, in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin, returning to Vietnam on 18 May 1971, she relieved USS Hancock (CV-19) on “Yankee Station” the same day, conducting Combat Missions, Special Operations and Single Carrier Operations, on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin from 18 May to 9 June 1971 (23-days). After an eight day line period on “Yankee Station,Midway stood down on 26 May 1971 for a one day rest, contiunig operational stand down until the 27th. With the exception of the stand-down period of 26 to 27 May and evasion of typhoon Dinah from 28 to 30 May 1971, the first line period was completed as scheduled and without mishap” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “On 18 June 1971, USS Midway (CVA-41) was privileged to be the host ship for the Seventh Fleet Change of Command ceremony as Vice Admiral Maurice F. Weisner, USN, was relieved by Vice Admiral William P, Mack, USN. Admiral Bernard A. Clarey addressed the gathering as guest speaker” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “Vice Admiral W. P. Mack relieved Vice Admiral M. F. Weisner as Commander Seventh Fleet on 18 June 1970 aboard USS Midway (CVA-41).

 

       Commander M. D. Cunningham relieved Captain G. E. Jacobssen Jr., as Executive Officer of USS Midway (CVA-41) from 31 January 1970 to 22 June 1971” (Ref. 1180I).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 14 to 24 June 1971, departing to conduct Combat Missions and Special Operations, on her second line periodYankee Station,” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin on 25 June 1971. In the Japanese port city of Yokosuka in early June 1971, the “Action Group” aboard Midway traveled to the Shunko Gakuen Orphanage where they painted and cleaned the building and its grounds. Then in keeping with the People to People intent of the program, the group headed by Chaplin Ben Mack, distributed a number of gifts, including basketballs, volleyballs, dolls, and clothing to the pleased youngsters, who were treated the following day to a tour and a fried chicken dinner aboard Midway. Vice Admiral W. P. Mack relieved Vice Admiral M. F. Weisner as Commander Seventh Fleet on 18 June 1970 aboard Midway. Commander M. D. Cunningham relieved Captain G. E. Jacobssen Jr., as Executive Officer of Midway from 31 January 1970 to 22 June 1971” (Ref. 405, 1080R, 1181Q & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) assumed “Yankee Station” responsibility again on 30 June 1971, conducting Exercise “Autumn Flower;” with the Japanese Defense Force and with Okinawa, Exercise “Commando Mirage” en route Yankee Station,” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin.

 

       Nature again forced a stand-down for USS Midway (CVA-41) on 5 July 1971. One hundred-twenty knot winds of Typhoon Harriet required the ship to run south before resuming air operations on 6 July 1971” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “On 10 July 1971, USS Midway (CVA-41) stood down from air operations. Captain William Lawrence Harris, Jr., USNA '46, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Midway on 10 July 1971, relieving Captain Eugene James Carroll, Jr., NAVCAD, 25th Commanding Officer, serving from January 31, 1970 - July 10, 1971. Rear Admiral John L, Butts, Jr., USN, Commander Carrier Division ONE was the guest speaker. An officer and enlisted reception followed the ceremony” (Ref. 1178-G, 1180J1, 1180J & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “The Honorable A. H. Meyer, United States Ambassador to Japan and Vice Admiral Mack, USN visited USS Midway (CVA-41) on 12 July 1971” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) Air Operations were again interrupted by nature - this time in the form of tropical storm Kim. Air operations were again initiated on 14 July 1971 and the Fleet Ocean Surveillance Information Facility Study group headed by Mr., Luzapone of DIA followed by Rear Admiral Robinson, Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla ELEVEN were briefed.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) Air Operations were again conducted from 14 July to 20 July 1971.

 

       Air operations events six and seven were cancelled on 16 July 1971 and the ship was forced to move south on the 17th and 18th. On 17 July 1971, Ambassador and Mrs., Togo, the Japanese Ambassador to the Republic of South Vietnam came aboard for a short stay. Rear Admiral Rogers also paid a visit to USS Midway (CVA-41) that day. Typhoon weather again had an effect on air operations but in Typhoon Jean’s case only moderately.

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Yankee Station,” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin, on 21 July 1971, conducting Special Operations on “Yankee Station” from 30 June to 20 July 1971 (21-days)” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).


      “USS Midway (CVA-41) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 22 July 1971, ending her second line period of Special Operations on “Yankee Station,” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin, departing “Yankee Station” on 21 July 1971, conducting Special Operations on “Yankee Station” from 30 June to 20 July 1971 (21-days). While transiting between liberty ports and “Yankee Station,” the usual training and replenishing cycles were conducted” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “On 26 July 1970, a number of crew members from USS Midway (CVA-41), accompanied by Midway’s Commanding Officer, Captain William L. Harris, Jr., was  privileged to participate in Project HANDCLASP, visiting the Olongapo General Hospital in Olongapo City, Republic of the Philippines. They brought with them sheets, special soap, gowns, medical bottles, artificial limbs with personal comfort packages for the patients. Mayor Amelia Gordon and staff doctors were on hand to receive gifts from Captain Harris and Midway crewmembers. One hundred-eighteen adults and twenty-five children received comfort packets with personal items.  General usage items such as soap, sheets and gowns, medical bottles and assorted artificial limbs were distributed to the staff. Mrs. Gordon graciously invited Midway crewmembers to a party as a gesture of thanks. A school in Rosario, another Philippine town, was chosen for the next project. Helicopters had to be used to transport men while trucks moved new school equipment over seven hours of bad roads to the town. Here the men painted furniture and constructed volleyball ad tetherball courts for the students” (Ref. 1180S).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 22 to 29 July 1971, departing 30 July 1971 to conduct Combat Missions and  Special Operations, on her third line period on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin (Ref. 405, 1180S & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

 

A Flight Deck Director aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) signals an F-4 Phantom II fighter into position on the starboard catapult, in preparation for launching, 5 August 1970. Photographed by PH2 Kevin J. Freedman. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97635). NS024125. NHC.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024125.jpg

 

      “Vice Admiral Waker arrived aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) for a two hour visit with Rear Admiral Butt on 6 August 1971” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) was honored by the visit of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, Mr. James E, Johnson and party on 11 August 1971. In addition to conferring with Rear Admiral Butts and Captain Harris, Mr. Johnson toured the ship and spoke with many of the crew” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) departed “Yankee Station” on 17 August 1971, conducting Air operations unabated unaffected by typhoons from 1 to 16 August 1971 (16-days), ending her third line period of Special Operations unaffected by typhoons on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 18 August 1971, ending her third period of Special Operations on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin, departing “Yankee Station” on 17 August 1971, conducting Air operations unabated unaffected by typhoons from 1 to 16 August 1971 (16-days) (Ref. 405, 1180S & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 18 to 23 August 1971. For six days we enjoyed fine weather and a chance to relax. The ship then departed for Hong Kong, B.C.C.” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Hongkong B. C. C. from 26 August to 1 September 1971. This free port was a mecca for bargains and sight-seeing. A number of lucky crew members were fortunate to share Hong Kong with their loved ones as a charter flight brought over 250 Midway dependents” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “A schedule change directed USS Midway (CVA-41) to proceed on 2 September 1971 to Yokosuka via “Yankee Station”” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 6 to 19 September 1971, departing on 20 September 1971, to conduct combat missions, on her fourth and last line period of Special Operations on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. Midway utlized the Japanese shipyard facility in preparation for our upcoming yard period in Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. The work to be done in Yokosuka would lay the groundwork for our conversion from burning NSFO or black oil to the Navy distillate fuel” (Ref. 405) & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) Air operations were severely curtailed, due to Typhoons Della and Elaine. Typhoon Delia forced Midway to move south but did not prevent air operations, however Typhoon Elaine prevented air operations on 7 and 9 October and severely restricted flying on 8 and 10 October” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) departed “Yankee Station” on 11 October 1971, headed for Subic Bay, ending her fourth and last line period of Special Operations, conducting Air operations on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin from 27 September to 10 October 1971 (9-days). Air operations were severely curtailed, however, due to Typhoons Della and Elaine. Typhoon Delia forced Midway to move south but did not prevent air operations, however Typhoon Elaine prevented air operations on 7 and 9 October and severely restricted flying on 8 and 10 October 1971 (Ref. 405, 1180S & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines for a brief stop on 14 October 1971 and then proceeded toward the Sea of Japan for Special Operations, ending her fourth and last line period of Special Operations, conducting Air operations on “Yankee Station” in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin from 27 September to 10 October 1971 (9-days). Air operations were severely curtailed, however, due to Typhoons Della and Elaine. Typhoon Delia forced Midway to move south but did not prevent air operations, however Typhoon Elaine prevented air operations on 7 and 9 October and severely restricted flying on 8 and 10 October 1971 (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Sea of Japan Operations from 18 to 19 October 1971. This exercise was marred by a mid-air collision between two Midway aircraft, an E-2B Hawkeye and an A-7B Corsair II, in which five men lost their lives (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Sasebo, Japan on 20 October 1971” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

 

      “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Sasebo, Japan from 20 to 24 October 1971. After four days inport Midway was underway for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref. 405 & MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “There were milestones for USS Midway (CVA-41) along the way home to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, such as the change in operational control to COMFIRSTFLT on 28 October 1971 and the anchorage at Pearl Harbor on 1 November 1971, for four hours of ammunition offload” (Ref. MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1971).

 

      “On 6 November 1971, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Rear Admiral J. L. Butts, Jr., Commander Carrier Division ONE, arriving aboard to assume duties of Carrier Division Commander on 15 April 1971 and at 0001 16 April activated CTG 17.3, with Captain F. T. Hemer as Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One, and Commander  Captain R. B. Rutherford, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 16 April 1971, with Captain William Lawrence Harris, Jr., USNA '46, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard when Midway stood down from air operations on 10 July 1971, relieving Captain Eugene James Carroll, Jr., NAVCAD, 25th Commanding Officer, serving from January 31, 1970 - July 10, 1971, and Captain G. E. Jacobssen Jr., as Executive Officer, ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her eighth South China Sea, on her second Vietnam Combat Cruise, conducting Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE); Yankee Station” responsibility again on 30 June 1971, on “Yankee Station,” conducting Combat Missions, Special Operations, Single Carrier Operations and Air Operations on four line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin on “Yankee Station,conducting Exercise “Autumn Flower;” with the Japanese Defense Force and with Okinawa, Exercise “Commando Mirage” en route Yankee Station” in the Far East. In April 1971, Midway began her deployment 13,000 tons heavier than her original full pay load figure. When she arrived off the coast of Vietnam, her Airwing commenced strikes and flew over 6,000 sorties in support of allied operations on four line periods totaling 69 days. Midway’s first day on the line, Triple zero (000) met every scheduled commitment throughout the deployment. Being based at Da Nang Air Base, RVN, careful, thorough fuel planning and management by flight crews was mandatory in conducting operations aboard ship without a fueling capability. This professional approach to airmanship was evident during every line period. Easy Way Airlines would begin displaying Midway’s flag throughout many foreign airports including Japan. Philippines, Okinawa, Taiwan, South Viet Nam, and Thailand, before C1A Triple Zero would return to San Francisco, California with Midway and will continue its operations out of NAS Alameda, California. Admiral E. R. Zumwalt, Jr.; A. H. Meyer, United States Ambassador to Japan; Souvanna Phouma, Prince of Laos, Japanese Ambassador to South Vietnam and CINCPACFLT, Admiral B. Clarey visited Midway. Midway returned home and was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, covering an area of 100.7 km² and is the 11th most populous city in Greater Tokyo, 12th in the Kantō region; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a second time; Hongkong, B. C. C., situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a third time; Yokosuka, Japan a second time and Sasebo, a city in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4B; VF-151, F-4B; VA-93, A-7B; VA-56, A-7B; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-130 Det. 2, EKA-3B; HC-1 Det. 8, SH-3G; *HC-7 Det. 110, HH-3A and **C1A Det., HH-3A. *These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment. ** Midway C1A Detachment, known as “Easy Way Airlines” was conceived, born and in full carrier operation in less than two weeks. During Midway’s conversion, all aviation fuel tanks were converted for jet fuel only and it was planned that only the turbojet powered C2A COD aircraft would be utilized. While en route to the Western Pacific word was received that all CVA’s would be required to carry one C1A aircraft for logistics, mail and cargo flights. Midway accepted her own C1A on 12 May 1971. The original “Cod Squad” crews conducted field quals at NAS Cubi Point on 14 to 15 May 1970 (The original “Cod Squad” crews – Ref. 1080N). Initial carrier quals on 16 to 17 May 1970. Midway flew the first scheduled logistics flight on 18 May 1970. She will under go her first deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her seventh deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington. In April 1971, Midway made her seventeenth deployment, not sixteenth (second Caribbean Sea Cruise in areas off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Culebra Island, Puerto Rico. While en route on 22 April 1946, Midway rendered a 21-gun salute to President Harry S, Truman who joined the task group in USS Frankland D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), flagship of the EIGHTH Fleet (and after visiting Port of Spain, Trinidad, the President left the task Group (1st FWFD) (19 April to 10 June 1946 (53-days)) or 3rd North Atlantic Cruise (Ports of calls included: Firth of Clyde, Greenock, Scotland Cherbourg, France) (26 August to 8 October 1952 (37-days)), as reported in Midway’s 1971 Command History Report 13,000 tons heavier than her original full pay load figure; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 17th deployment since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (16 April to 6 November 1971)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1180, 1180AA, 1180A, 1180B, 1180C, 1180D, 1180D1, 1180D2, 1180E, 1180F, 1180G, 1180H, 1180I, 1180J, 1180J2, 1180J3, 1080K, 1180L, 1180M, 1180N, 1180O, 1180P, 1180Q, 1180R, 1180S, 1180T, 1180U, 1180V, 1180W, 1180X, 1180Y, 10181N, USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1972).

 

       USS Midway (CVA 41) Eighth “WestPac” deployment, 1971 Senior Command and Staff - USS Midway (CVA 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1971 – Chapter 24, Appendix I.

 

       USS MIDWAY (CV-41) 1971 Vietnam Combat Cruise - 1971 North Vietnam Sortie statistics and BDA – (bomb damage assessment) for First to Fourth Line Periods during North Vietnam Operations (16 April to 6 November 1971) – Chapter 24, Appendix II.

 

       USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) 2nd VIETNAM COMBAT CRUISE, AWARDS AND CASUALTY REPORTS - 8th WestPac” Deployment (16 April to 6 November 1971) – Chapter 24, Appendix III.

 

      Eighth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her eighth South China Sea, on her second Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station” in the Far East Summary (16 April to 6 November 1971). – Chapter 24, Appendix IV.